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Would your child like to sleep in a tree house?

Posted by Admin | June, 2013

There is a place in Nominingue, just north of Tremblant, where you can do an overnight stay in an actual tree house.

By Alissa Sklar

treehouse

Although my family lives in a reasonably comfortable house in the city, we put a lot of effort into not sleeping at home. Over the years, we have camped out under the stars, spent a night in a yurt in Mont Tremblant park, and even tried to sleep in an igloo my daughters built (the cold put an end to that adventure).

My daughters had also expressed interest in sleeping in the treehouse they built with their dad, but it never worked out. No roof, too many mosquitoes. So when I saw an ad promoting overnight stays in an enclosed treehouse near Nominingue (just north of Mont Tremblant), I jumped at the chance. We made a reservation, packed up the kids and dog and drove a couple of hours north, hoping for a night of family togetherness and a bit of adventure in a forest canopy.

We weren’t disappointed.

When we arrived at Les Toits du Monde, right off Lake Nominingue, we walked a short path into the woods to the coolest treehouse we’d ever seen. Fifteen feet off the forest floor, and accessible by a staircase (so even little ones and the dog can access it), the structure sits between two suspended bridges. A rope and pulley helps you raise and lower your gear.

The treehouse, which sleeps six, has running water, a woodstove, propane elements for cooking, a composting toilet (no 3 a.m. trips down into the woods to answer the call of nature) and even a solar shower.

A lot of love, care and creativity have gone into the details of this structure. Everything is made from hewn wood, from the mouldings to the shelves. A hollowed out log with a drain is the “sink” into which large containers of water are poured.

And once you’ve explored the treehouse, there are lots of activities in the surrounding area.

We wandered through the site, checking out the other structures the owners are building: a huge teepee with wooden sleeping platform, a hobbit house being hollowed out of the side of a hill and a large canvas yurt. Little kids will enjoy the funny faces that have been put onto random trees along the path.

Families who enjoy biking can take advantage of the nearby P’tit Train du Nord bike path that passes along the shores of Lake Nominingue. There is also a public beach in the town of Nominingue, golf, trails for hiking, canoe rentals and tubing on the nearby Rouge River.

treehouse
That evening, we put together a feast using both the woodstove and the propane burner. As the sun set, two solar-powered lamps provided plenty of light. We took advantage of the lack of Internet access to play a marathon game of Monopoly and then hunkered down in our sleeping bags.


The next morning, we had the pleasure of getting our breakfast delivered. For an extra $7 per person, the treehouse hosts sent over a basket filled with warm waffles, maple syrup, delicious rolls, jam, fruit salad, juice, hot chocolate and coffee. It certainly made the stay more relaxing for me as meal prep can make an outdoor adventure seem like less than a vacation.

Packing up, we were sad to leave our house in the air, but we’re already looking forward to trying out the hobbit house when it’s ready for visitors.

Treehouse stays are $125 per night, plus tax. Children stay free but each adult after the first two is an additional $10. Breakfast can be ordered for $7 per person.

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A Night in Quebec's Treehouse Hotel

Posted by Admin | May, 2013
treehouse

Remember when you used to play in treehouses as a kid? At one resort in the Laurentians, you still can.

By Seattle Dredge


“You guys, we’re sleeping in a treehouse tonight.”

I couldn’t stop saying it as we drove through the tree-lined roads of rural Quebec, in a strange disbelief that I was about to live out a childhood dream. I said it again as we parked the car, and continued saying it as we walked down the muddy forest trail with all our bags.



I could hardly believe it when I saw it.
treehouse


Hovering 15 feet above the forest floor rested a castle of wooden beams, rope bridges and elaborate eco-construction. I squealed with childlike delight and ditched my bags at the base before bounding up the log-stacked stairs.

I swung the door open, revealing a high-ceilinged room holding a couch and table, separate washroom and small kitchen area. The interior was complete with propane and wood stoves, a composting toilet, water and basic shower, and a second floor loft full of comfortable mattresses. The outside sported a wide balcony with chairs, two rope bridges that bounced as you walked along them, a spiralling wooden staircase and an island around another tree connected by one of the bridges.



treehouse


We were in Nominingue, Quebec, at Les Toits du Monde, a self-proclaimed establishment of unusual and ecologic accommodations and outdoor activities, just two hours north of Montreal. Aside from the treehouse itself, Les Toits du Monde also offers a Native American Teepee, a Mongolian yurt and will soon have a fully functioning Hobbit House and Igloo.

We spent the evening making the most of our temporary tree-trop dwelling by exploring the surrounding forest and playing tricks on each other in the darkness, drinking a few beers and roasting marshmallows in our living room’s wood-burning stove.

When morning arrived, the light shone brightly through the windows and into the loft, but I was too comfy to move. It was until I heard the promise of a hot morning tea that I managed to pull myself down the ladder.



treehouse


Outside on the balcony, my treemate pulled on a rope, grasping one hand over the other and gliding it through a pulley in a continual motion. A large cloth-covered basket popped up over the edge, attached to a hook on the end of the rope. Breakfast had arrived.

After breakfast, we packed up our things, said our goodbyes to the magical little house in the trees and headed back down the path to the real world.

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Channeling Peter Pan in a Quebecois Treehouse

Posted by Admin | May, 2013

And then! We fought pirates! And Captain Hook! And then! We rescued Wendy!

By Zak Erving

treehouse

"It's fun watching grown adults see the treehouse for the first time," our host at Les Toits du Monde explained in thick Quebecois-English. "They are like children when they see it. Like Peter Pan and the Lost Boys or something." We all nodded in agreement, having experienced that same reaction when we had arrived the night before: Candice and Seattle giddily scaled the loft, as Ryan and I snapped away at the empty room before its cleanliness was obliterated by vomiting suitcases and backpacks.

A standing bar perched prominently on one midair island, across a cable bridge that swung wildly when being traversed. The treehouse itself was well stocked, and featured a manual shower, propane range burners in the kitchen, and (my favorite) a cast iron stove in the corner, guaranteed to keep the house warm, even in the dead of winter. Our stay was short—exploring Nominingue in our brief visit wasn't much of an option in the half-day we had there—but it won't be the last.

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One night in a tree house at Les toits du monde

Posted by Admin | May, 2013
By Candice


I had the pleasure of staying in a REAL, fancy-pants tree house a few weeks ago, basically living out a childhood fantasy in a very adult fashion. There were beers, and epic feasts, and I might have screamed over spiders and accidentally dumping dishwater on my feet. Never mind the fact it was like, REALLY dark outside, guys. (Also, was anyone else under the impression that “tree house” should be one word?)

Anyone remember that episode of Fresh Prince of Bel-Air where Will goes to the tree house to console Carlton, needs to use the bathroom, and Carlton responds with, “Down the hallway, to the left”? (Great, I tried to find this scene and ended up watching 10 minutes of ultimate Fresh Prince moments. Thanks, YouTube.) I always wanted that experience. And I got it.

In the Upper Laurentians of Quebec, near Grand Lake Nominingue, the folks at Les toits du monde are creating some of the coolest accommodations experiences in Canada. Like this tree house.

treehouse
treehouse

The owners have already set up a fully functional tipi, and during my visit, they were wrapping up the final details on a yurt. Next up: a hobbit house. SERIOUSLY. Plus they’re some of the nicest, friendliest people you’ll ever meet.

We were delighted with the prospect of being FORCED to unplug our gadgets—no WiFi, and there were certainly no power outlets. The tree house is about a 10-minute walk into the woods, and so there’s also an emphasis on being eco-friendly. The toilet is compost, for example.

We arrived late afternoon and spent some time exploring the area, snapping photos and being bloggers. I was delighted to simply stretch out on the futon and read my book, without even the hum of electricity to bother me (there is a lighting solar panel).


treehouse

After picking up some supplies in town (note: minimal English spoken here), Ryan and Seattle got busy preparing the most epic feast you could possibly prepare on a two-burner propane stone. We had thick hamburgers, roasted sweet potatoes with onions and bacon, and stuffed red peppers. I read my book while they prepared food, and offered to do the dishes afterwards. Little did I know that without running water, cleaning dishes (especially those with bacon fat) is about an all-evening endeavor. I shook my fist at the sky.



treehouse

We had planned on setting up the fire pit outside, but when night rolled around, my brave resolve fell apart. Like I said, it’s DARK out there. Like, really, really dark. And so we decided to roast giant marshmallows in the wood stove instead. The results were delicious.


treehouse
treehouse

We carried out the rest of the evening listening to Ryan’s interesting (read: disastrous) harmonica demonstrations and chatting and cleaning dishes. Goddamn those dishes. When it was time for bed, I settled in the loft while Zak took care of the wood stove downstairs. I awoke in the middle of the night being suffocated with the heat, and there was an unfortunate amount of boob sweat. Turns out the tree house is winter-insulated.

The next morning, our breakfast was delivered in a picnic basket via PULLEY ROPE. How freaking cool is that? PULLEY ROPE. It was the best breakfast we had on the road—fruit cups, waffles, coffee, homemade jam, and bread.


treehouse
treehouse

And then I had to do the dishes.



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Interview sur Allo la Planète

Posted by Admin | February, 2013

Passage dans l'émission Allo la Planète sur le volontariat au Québec et les Toits du Monde !! Merci à Ariane Landraing woofeuse des Toits du monde pour nous avoir présenté et à Eric Lange animateur de l'émission :)

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Mamzelle Stella:{MA cabane au Canada}

Posted by Admin | September, 2012
Par Mamzelle Stella


Une fin de semaine de 3 jours pour fêter la fête du travail en Amérique du Nord. L'été qui joue les prolongations, on n'est pas vraiment rentré de vacances (dans nos têtes). Alors nous voulions quelque chose d'insolite, de dépaysant. En presque 7 années ici, nous en avons fait des chalets, hôtels, motels, B & B, mais un chalet perché dans les arbres jamais. Une amie m'avait parlé de ce concept et je voulais vraiment faire cette expérience en famille. Après une petite recherche nous avons trouvé ce bijou : Les Toits du Monde. Les réservations faites, les bagages bouclés nous voilà en route pour l'aventure. Pour nous dès que nous sommes sur la 15N nous sommes en vacances, à nous la liberté ... Une petite pause chez La P'tite Patate pour un "Hot Dog Steamé All Dress' ..."


... et nous voilà chez Sylvain et Dior un couple de jeunes entrepreneurs qui a lancé ce concept d'habitations insolites et écologiques avec Les Toits du Monde. Accueil très chaleureux de Sylvain qui nous accompagne dans la découverte de notre demeure pour ces trois jours. Je vous conseille de suivre leur page Facebook, vous y verrez la construction de ce chalet planche à planche. Un Tipi bientôt, et bien d'autres habitations tout aussi originales les unes que les autres. Allez on monte :


Cela se trouve à Nominingue dans les Hautes Laurentides, la région est splendide et de nombreuses activités se sont offertes à nous.

Du vélo sur la piste cyclable du Petit Train du Nord :


Une belle randonnée dans la réserve faunique de Papineau Labelle :


Une baignade et une partie de volley à la plage municipale de Nominingue :


Et même du magasinage d'artisanat amérindien chez Topasannah :


Je vous dis à bientôt pour un séjour en Tipi de Mamzelle Stella.

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Un article dans le journal local !!!

Posted by Admin | June, 2012
Par Luc Bélisle

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